Should kids pick their own clothes?

The other day, Beaver and I went shopping. Her idea. She’s only almost seven, but already there is NO way I can pick clothes for her. Unless I want them to hang, unworn, in her wardrobe. ‘I would never let my daughter pick her own clothes,‘ a friend said. ‘She can pick them when she can pay for them.‘ Good point. Should kids wear what we tell them or should we allow them to have some input? What say you?

As NOT seen in Vogue.

My girls have dressed themselves for some time now. I think you can probably tell. Here is a selection of outfits that I have NOT had any input in.

belly

Changing outfits AT THE AIRPORT 

photo (1)

Going to the park. Obviously.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

helly kitty

When Hello Kitty throws up all over you

victorian

Should I dress my kids like this ALL the time?

 

 

 

 

 

 

flamenco

An appropriate outfit for bedtime?

bedtime

More appropriate bedtime outfits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expressive or lazy?

My official line is that I think it’s important for them to have some form of self-expression in lives that are otherwise decided for them. My unofficial line is I’m a bit lazy and can’t always face the arguments that ensue if I try to tell them what to wear. (By the way, if it’s a church day or a special occasion, I’m absolutely telling them what they can and, more importantly, can’t wear to avoid them looking like ladies of the night. ‘No. You can’t wear hot pants with wellies and ear muffs. BECAUSE IT’S INAPPROPRIATE!”)

Maybe I’m a walkover. I don’t know. But amidst some of the crazy outfits they wear, sometimes they get it really, really right. And I think, ‘Wow. HOW did they put that together?‘ and I secretly hope they are going to be creative geniuses who will keep me in shoes in my old age rather than crazy, old bag ladies.

And laziness aside, I do believe in them having some choice in who they are and how the world sees them.

But at ages, four and six, am I being premature in this view?

Shop till you drop.

Once we’d got the shopping rules established – ‘We aren’t shopping for you Mum, you’re not allowed to look at anything.’ – it was really interesting watching Beaver shop. Buzzing around. Picking up things. Putting them back. Checking sizes. It’s not like she flicks through fashion magazines or follows fashion bloggers. But she knew what she was looking for all the same.

And mostly, I approved of what she chose. Jeans, shorts and slogan t-shirts. That’s pretty much my outfit every day. Who doesn’t love a slogan t-shirt? There were a few, questionable items I had to diplomatically steer her away from. The sandals that were so glitzy they looked like they should have been hanging from a dance floor ceiling and the Minion hat that went with absolutely nothing. I gave in on the Monday-Friday knickers. Even though I know that’s going to come back and bite me on the a*** when I haven’t done the washing and we have a row about wearing Thursday knickers on a Monday.

And I admired her confidence. Even though I know that peer-pressure is starting to creep in, every now and then.

Long may it last.

Self-expression or self-destruction?

When we got home, we had to have a full on fashion show. For Daddy Pig. Where Beaver tried on every single outfit and every single outfit combination.

There was music. There was dancing. There was twerking, I think. And funny, involuntary movements that made us wonder if she was dancing or having a seizure.

‘Is this weird?’ I whispered to Daddy Pig.

‘It’s, erm, interesting,’ he said.

‘Maybe we’ll just get her dance lessons.’

‘Good idea.’ 

And, in that moment, I wondered if I’m encouraging her to grow up too fast, too soon. Or is this just how life is now? Is it ok? Or in seven more years am I going to be wishing I hadn’t given her any free rein and dressed her in head to toe paisley, like my mum did me?

Or worse, am I going to have created such a fashionista, that she dresses better than me and I’m reduced to asking to borrow her clothes, because I can’t afford to buy my own?

Right. Where’s that paisley all-in-one gone…?

Would love to hear your thoughts on this one. Especially mums of older girls. Leave a comment here or on the Facebook page. And follow my Instagram if you want fashion advice from an almost seven year old. (I probably wouldn’t if I was you. Just a heads up.)

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    3 thoughts on “Should kids pick their own clothes?

    1. Annabel

      I am still haunted when my eldest was in pre school. I.e. 3/4 years old and when I tried to dress her one morning She looked mortified and said “I am NOT letting my friends are me in THAT”… I think it helps with independence – we had no problems with dressing for PE at school – and frankly it reacts who they are. I know I wouldn’t want them to dress me every (or any) day so why should we… Obviously if we were going somewhere important I get the final say. For now anyway. I thought the arguments over clothing was when they were in their teens… Got that wrong too!!

      Reply
    2. Victoria

      I give my 3 year old girl some choice to her wardrobe. For example I’ll show her 2-3 outfits and she can decide from those. I agree – good to give them choice & independence but sometimes I do need to intervene for practical reasons!

      Reply
    3. Muddling Along

      ABSOLUTELY (although to be fair with Littler I didn’t have any choice, she knew what she wanted to wear and wear it she would)

      What I’ve found fascinating is the reactions from other people – they’re children and not fashion models so what does it really matter in the greater scheme of things?

      Reply

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